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M+Pavillion Two-Storey Exhibition
M+ Pavilion is a two-storey exhibition and event space in the midst of the Hong Kong West Kowloon Cultural District.In September 2013, the Hong Kong West Kowloon Cultural District Authority launched an open competition for the design of the M+ Pavilion. The winning design went to the team of VPANG architects ltd + JET Architecture Inc + Lisa Cheung which stood out from among 100 international entries. The building was completed and opened to public in July 2016.The architecture is represented as a Floating Art Platform. It is elevated on a berm, blending itself into the surroundings of the City Park by mirrored external walls.In line with the overall City Park design concept of the West Kowloon Cultural District, the Floating Art Platform aims at offering a respite from hectic city life. It should be a simple, pure and clean space; a space situated away from city noise and pollution, a space that gives us a chance to open our hearts, relax our minds, and appreciate artwork amidst the backdrop of the cityscape.Mirrored external walls are not only camouflaging, but also reverberating and witnessing the transformation of the surroundings and city in time. The elevated main exhibition space made the structure as if floating amongst trees and foliage while the white walls filtered the environment noises. Art could be displayed, promoted, shared and embraced. It belongs to the city, near and dear to the heart of Hong Kong.Our design also explored the notion of ecology with the same smart simplistic approach as our overall concept, where the building, topographic landscape, wide spreading tree canopies works together forming a continuous whole. This extensive greenery addresses our emphasis on the incorporation of manmade and natural environment.The main exhibition space has full length openable glazed doors to create connection between indoor and outdoor exhibition spaces to allow multiple disciplines and multiple exhibition or event formats.
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The Democratic Monument
Civic buildings are, as a rule, both austere and intimidating. They are often designed to represent authority above all, taking cues from Classical architectural language to construct an image of power, dominance, and civic unity. Adam Nathaniel Furman, a London-based architect and thinker, has at once eschewed and reengaged this typology in order to propose an entirely new type of civic center (“Town Hall”) for British cities. The proposal, which was commissioned by the 2017 Scottish Architectural Fringe as part of a New Typologies exhibition in which architects are imagining “how our shared civic infrastructure will exist in the future, if at all”, is currently on display in Glasgow.By “re-grouping various civic functions into one visually symbolic composition of architectural forms,” references and types of ornament and allusions have been configured “depending on the metropolitan area within which it is situated in and embodies.” In short, Furman states, the Democratic Monument “is an expression of urban pride, chromatic joy, and architectural complexity” which has universal symbolism but remains a beacon to its vicinity.Democratic Monument / Adam Nathaniel FurmanThe 1800s was an era of dramatic change, tumultuous growth, vigour, and pride for British cities, all of which was anchored and guided by the Victorian Town Hall. Liberal Mayors across the country spearheaded reforms, and massive urban improvements that transformed the lives of those living in the new metropolises. Huge resources were funnelled through local government, with half of all national public spending being dispensed from Town Halls. As well as directing public improvements, better schools, infrastructural provision and housing programs, these homes of local government themselves became symbolic embodiments of their respective cities. Their eloquent facades spoke of civic pride, communal purpose, economic strength, and artistic verve. Their interiors contained multipurpose halls, whose size and opulence made Buckingham Palace seem twee and quaint, and which were used for events and meetings whose purpose was the pursuit of public betterment through the spectacle of public art and democracy, rather than the pageantry of an isolated monarchy.After the second World War, in a national equivalent of the pioneering reforms of the great Liberal mayors of the 19th Century, Britain was reconfigured into a nation that designed itself into a more equal and opportune disposition, in which infrastructure and opportunity were crafted by the public purse, for the broadest possible demographic. Gone were the vast republican roman temples competing with the beautiful behemoths of British Neo-Baroque, the people palaces of competing virtual city-states, and in came Modernity, a universal design language that spoke of a shared future, and universal values. The distinctly monumental Town Hall became the Civic Complex, and the deliciously florid interiors of pomp-for-the-people became the shining, diamond-cut glass, and rough-hewn concrete collected forms of libraries, sports centres, polytechnics and municipal offices, all carefully orchestrated around and within plazas, spaces slightly removed from the profane life of the city, elevated and set apart as glimpses of an organised, perfected collective destiny.As globalisation, deregulation, and the European dream reached their respective zeniths in the 2000s under “New Labour,” architecture once again took on a starring role in the perpetual transformation of our cities. Private capital mingled with state funding to deliver colourful new spaces which mixed consumption and education, and profit and provision, in an apotheosis of an historical compromise between society and the market. The presence of municipal bodies and of the state was reduced, modified, and rebranded within the context of leisure and shopping, of pleasure and experience. Single function iconic architectural objects, libraries, galleries and music halls, were inserted into the partially-privatised, super-slick new urban environments in a manner that sutured the feeling of growing wealth and cultural expansion, with the idea of an otherwise visually retreating state.We are fast moving into another period of profound change in which society is resurgent, cities are once again looking to govern themselves, and there is an expectation that the state will return in a novel and more varied form to give sustenance to a population that has grown tired of the empty calories of shopping, and their sense of separation from the centres of bureaucratic power. Our cities are expanding at a rate not seen in a century, and as Mayors and city councils with muscle and financial independence begin to return to regions clamouring for devolved autonomy, there is an opportunity to reconfigure the balance of our cities. Through reforms and muscular policy agendas these political units will need to reinvigorate the agency of civic authorities, while at the same time there is an opportunity to anchor our expanding urban areas with symbolic social fulcrums that embody a shared sense of progress, of cultural production, of history, and of democratic projection.
www.archdaily.com
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Prefab buildings by Ten Fold Engineering build themselves in eight minutes

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100,000 forbidden books used to construct Parthenon replica on Nazi book-burning site
Argentinian artist Marta Minujín has used thousands of prohibited books to construct a replica of the Parthenon in Athens on a Nazi book-burning site in Kassel, Germany.Taking a stance against censorship, Minujín designed the Parthenon of Books to echo the classical Greek temple, which remains a major icon of the democratic Athenian polis.Metal scaffolding mimics the form of the temple, which is then covered in books held by plastic wrapping. All the books were donated by the public from a shortlist of over 170 titles that are either currently or formerly prohibited.Also emphasising Minujín’s motivation is the chosen site of Friedrichsplatz Park, where Nazi sympathisers burned an estimated 2,000 prohibited books on 19 May 1933.The installation forms part this year’s Documenta 14 art festival in Kassel, a city in the north of central German state Hesse. It responded to a brief that asked contributing artists to explore the relationship between Kassel and Athens – the festival’s partnering city.But this is not the first time that Minujín has created the Parthenon of Books. The artist also constructed a replica in Buenos Aires, choosing books banned during Argentinian military dictatorship from 1976 to 1983.It opened just one week after the restoration of democracy on 19 December 1983, and the following week it was tipped over by two cranes to allow the public to take the books they wanted.A similar distribution of the books is planned for the end of Documenta 14, although details are not yet confirmed.Minujín also teamed up with the University of Kassel and professors Nikola Roßbach and Florian Gassner to compile a list of books that are currently forbidden in various locations around the world.Book burnings took place in cities across Germany in 1933 as part of the Aktion wider den undeutschen Geist, which translates as a Campaign against the Un-German Spirit.Organised by the German Students Union, the events were intended to bring arts and culture in line with the Nazi ideals and rid blacklisted authors from circulation. Mass burnings were scheduled to take place on 10 May 1933 but Kassel’s was delayed due to rainfall.www.dezeen.com
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Tree House in the Outskirts of Brussels
This house for an artist includes the street level of an existing small house. It now houses the entry hall, a family room and a kitchen; the living-room and the stairway are in the extension to the building.
The second floor includes the master bedroom with its bathroom, as well as ve children’s rooms and sanitary installations. They are equipped with a mezzanine protected by textile netting that will lead to the glassed-wall facade.The house presents curved and vegetalised facades that are very private and closed to the neighbours to the north, the east and the south. In contrast, the west facade is entirely glass-walled as if it were one huge partitioned window.It is planned that Immense translucid white polyester curtains in widths of 1.6 m suspended from the top of the structure to the ground floor would run along this great « window » to ensure shade in the summer months.Initially conceived as a wall of ivy with a patinated cop- per roof, the vegetalised facade is finally composed of a selection of exotic plants chosen by the botanical artist Patrick Blanc, and extends to cover the roof.We had to design the structure, the insulation, and the water-tightness of the envelope and resolve the building physics issues in order to receive the necessary support systems, irrigation and fertilisation systems for the plants that are set into a felt support stapled to rigid PVC panels.
www.archdaily.com
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Gerry Judah’s latest towering Goodwood sculpture pays homage to Bernie Ecclestone
Each of the five Formula One cars suspended from this 35-metre-high installation by Gerry Judah are intended to represent key moments in the career of race-car driver Bernie Ecclestone.Designed by British artist and designer Gerry Judah, the sculpture was presented at the Goodwood Festival of Speed, which took place over the weekend.Judah has been commissioned to create a new Central Feature sculpture at the festival each year since 1999.He based 2017’s iteration on former race-car driver and ex-Formula 1 chairman Bernie Ecclestone. Each of the five cars on the huge looping structure, which Judah says together are worth “millions of pounds”, are linked to different points in Ecclestone’s career.”Each car has a link to a different aspect of Bernie Ecclestone’s career, such as the Connaught, for which he was entered as driver in two F1 races in the 1958 season, and the championship-winning Brabham, from the period when he was Brabham team owner,” said Judah.“The other cars in this year’s Central Feature are a Lotus, Ferrari and Mercedes, reflecting his time in Formula 1 management, which culminated as F1 chief executive.”As with Judah’s previous works for Goodwood, the sculpture towers above festival goers – measuring 35 metres tall and weighing 65 tonnes.The pieces of white steel have been welded together, and the entire structure took six weeks to fabricate and install.Last year, Judah’s sculpture was made up of six giant steel spikes, while his 2015 structure presented a pair of Mazda race cars on a
twisting track based on the form of a letter opener designed by Enzo Mari in 1962.2014 saw the British artist create an arcing sculpture that curved over Goodwood House, with a pair of Mercedez-Benz race cars positioned to appear as if hurtling past each other.In previous years he has created giant knotted sculpture, and a bright red looping structure that referenced the Alfa Romeo cloverleaf badge.The designer was also commissioned by Porsche in 2015 to create a soaring steel sculpture for its Stuttgart museum.This year’s Goodwood Festival of Speed took place from 29 June to 3 July 2017 in West Sussex, England.
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Office of the Future

Killa Design has developed the world’s first fully functional and permanently occupied 3D printed office in Dubai. Office of the Future building is currently the home for the Dubai Future Foundation as well as an exhibition space and incubator for future emerging technologies in the region. The initiative comes as part of a Dubai 3-D printing strategy launched in the same year, which focuses on the development of 3D printing to improve people’s lives in the construction and medical sectors.The entire structure of the building was manufactured using an additive concrete ‘printing’ technique using a 3D printer 20 feet high, 120 feet long and 40 feet wide. The printer features an automated robotic arm to implement the printing process which lasted 17 days and was installed on site in two days. Subsequent work on the building services, interiors, and landscape took approximately three months.As a result of this innovative construction technique, the labor cost was cut by more than 50% compared to conventional buildings of similar size, and wastage on site was minimized which helped to reduce the overall environmental footprint of the project.The office complex radiates around a tree-shaded cafe courtyard. It comprises a partnership lounge & gallery for exhibitions, events, and workshops, a flexible space for team brainstorming and design work and private meeting rooms for quiet work. A series of openings throughout the project bring natural daylight deep into space while allowing occupants to remain connected to the outside environment. The building layout has been designed to facilitate a mix of creative interactions, quite reflective work, and serendipitous meetings.As part of our wider initiative to be involved in the most cutting edge and innovative projects, we made use of a super insulated cladding system, fabricated using computer controlled manufacturing techniques, to form the unique and complex geometry of the building envelope.Ben Piper, a partner at Killa Design and the architect behind the master plan and cladding design says: ‘The progressive design of the office conveys a shift from the traditional form of work environments thus paving the way for stimulating innovation and communication within teams.”Unique in its design and modularity, the Office of the Future is being hailed as a first major initiative and ground breaking example of computer controlled fabrication in building construction.The project is a precursor to the Museum of the Future (also designed by Killa Design). It is part of the Dubai Future Agenda strategy, launched by the UAE to become a major incubator of innovation and future technology in the world.www.archdaily.com
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Alpine Loft
From the architect. The village of Mathon has remained remarkably intact without significant alterations to the built fabric. At its heart sits an old wooden barn which has fallen into disrepair. If it were to be demolished it would never be replaced creating a gap in the centre of the village. To preserve both the structure of the barn and its role in the village ensemble it is converted into an alpine loft, a place for work and reflection. The project draws upon examples from far away, most prominently the Japanese house.Loving the Ordinary
Buildings are more than singular objects; they are part of the urban environment they shape. Like a street, a district, a community. Buildings accommodate the people who use them intensively. Today, tomorrow, every day and every year. That is why we need buildings that stand the test of time. Buildings that stay relevant thanks to their solidity, usability and durability. In that way, they are embedded in our complex, ever changing urban environment. Trends may come and go, but we love the long lasting power of the ordinary. The everyday is here to stay.We Combine Simplicity with Sophistication
Our team strongly believes in the elegance of simple solutions to complex problems, without overseeing the context in which we operate. Our thinking and designs always incorporate the environmental, social and cultural dimensions that are related to architecture and city planning. Our interest in longevity and connectivity of buildings asks for a process of careful observation, adjustment and refinement. The combination of reduction and simplicity on the one hand and enrichment and sophistication on the other hand lends additional meaning to our buildings.
www.archdaily.com
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Zhongshuge Bookstore – A store we would spend days in never mind hours!
“Few visitors come to my Thatched Cottage which is in the west of Wanli Bridge, but I take things as they are and accompanied by the Baihua Pond.”In more than 1200 years ago, the great poet Du Fu left a warm memory of Chengdu by such a poem, the mentioned historical and cultural place names like the Baihua Pond, Thatched Cottage have been passed down till now. In teahouses throughout the streets, one could listen to the storyteller’s expansive talking as tasting the authentic famous tea of Sichuan. Thus, the street culture of Chengdu has become a unique landscape as Chengdu, with its special cultural atmosphere and unique leisure, runs through every person’s life, and properly shows its elegance and leisure.Zhongshuge, labeled as valuing culture, comes to Chengdu – a city full of cultural charm. The project is located in Yintai Center in Chengdu Tianfu Avenue. Taking the mall escalator to the 4F, we can see the familiar Zhongshuge label – text curtain wall at first glance. In order to integrate better with this charming city, Shu culture is embodied in the text curtain wall . Please find it by yourself.After the curtain wall it is a space full of “bamboo shaped book shelves”. The wall follows the using of stable bookshelf shape of Zhongshuge, which makes visitors feel familiar even though it was their first time to come. Small tables on the floor which looks like “bamboo shoots” are active in this vibrant space.Walk through the “bamboo forest” to its right side, it is the children area, a jungle-paradise-like world. The walls: it seems that the houses, windmills and lovely pandas are hiding behind the bamboo forest. “Big Mushrooms” scatter on the continuing boardwalk, shielding the children who reading books under them. Certainly, mirror ceiling, as another symbol of Zhongshuge, is also applied to this area.The vaguely visible red brick wall on the left side of the “bamboo forest” is the most distinctive place in this Zhongshuge. In this 5 meters high space, the red brick wall piled up to the top and circled independent small zones. A walking path above sometimes goes around the walls, and sometimes goes through the door. Rest seats and benches scatter beside the French window, just to imagine how pleasant it would be to taste a cup of tea while reading your favorite book in warm sunny afternoons!In the end of the small zones, taking book stairs, we come to the lecture hall. The arbitrary lines form scattered ladders with different heights for walking or sitting. In the reflection of the mirror ceiling, they are “terraced fields”. Here, you can listen to a spiritual lecture or a thoughtful drama.

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Jenny Sabin stretches robotically woven canopy across MoMA PS1 courtyard
New York-based Jenny Sabin Studio has made a canopy of robotically knitted textile at MoMA PS1 in Queens that sprays mist in the day and glows at night.Lumen was designed for MoMA’s 2017 Young Architects Program as a sustainable shelter for the museum’s Warm Up music series during summer.
To create the canopy, architectural design practice Jenny Sabin Studio chose to use recycled photo-luminescent textiles that collect solar energy and produce light.It glows in hues of blue, pink and purple at night time, and exhibits more subtle changes during the day.“With innovative construction and design processes borne from a critical merging of technology and nature to precise attention to detail at every scale, Lumen will no doubt engage visitors from day to night in a series of graduated environments and experiences,” said MoMA associate curator Sean Anderson.Two cellular fabric canopies stretch across the courtyard, formed from over a million yards of digitally knitted and robotically woven fibre.Some of its holes are left open, while other portions droop down to form 250 fabric tubes, which hang underneath the canopy like stalactites with frills at the bottom that visitors can touch and play with.Other features include an integrated misting system, which sprays water when visitors are near to cool them down during the hot summer weather.”Held in tension within the walls of MoMA PS1’s courtyard, Lumen turns visitors into participants who interact through its responsiveness to temperature, sunlight, and movement,” said MoMA PS1 director Klaus Biesenbach.Three private seating areas are made where tall black poles pierce through the surface of the web-like structure, with the large holes supported by circular frames.The openings are wrapped in tensile rope that extends in diagonals from the top of the pole to the floor.One hundred recycled wooden spool stools furnish the inside, and are also wrapped in robotically woven fabrics.
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